Dr. Barry Sears Dr. Sears Comments:

Compared to other interventions, gastric bypass surgery is the best approach to treating obesity and diabetes.  That’s a rather pathetic statement to our current treatment knowledge of these metabolic disorders.  Although the article does mention that most will have a lifetime of malnutrition, it glosses over the fact that 25% of bypass patients regain much of the weight and new addictive disorders arise to replace the lack of dopamine stimulation that previously came with eating food.

The Surgical Solution to Obesity?

“Half my life has been about trying to lose weight,” Henry Roberts said. He was telling me about his decision to have a surgery that would reduce the size of his stomach by seventy-five per cent. Roberts (a pseudonym) is five feet six, and when we met he weighed two hundred and seventy pounds, giving him a body-mass index of forty-four; a B.M.I.

Dr. Barry Sears Dr. Sears Comments:

I am continually amazed that researchers tend to believe genetic knock-outs before they understand the complexity of appetite.  Appetite is a complex orchestration of hunger signals (coming from ghrelin and other hormones) and satiety signals (coming from PYY, GLP-1, and other hormones). The only approach that works to lower ghrelin levels is calorie restriction by gastric bypass surgery (calorie restriction alone increases ghrelin).  But the levels of of PYY and GLP-1 also increase in gastric bypass patients.  This is why gastric bypass surgery remains the most effective long-term weight approach because all the hormones that control hunger and energy storage are effected.

“Hunger Hormone” May Drive Fat Storage, Not Appetite

Everyone is familiar with the complaints of a hungry stomach. For years, scientists attributed the gnawing increase in appetite before a meal to ghrelin, a hormone which is secreted in the gut and circulates in the blood, playing a role in food intake and storage.

 

Dr. Barry Sears Dr. Sears Comments:

Consistent exercise is a great drug as long as you do it.  The primary benefits in cardiovascular disease is to reduce insulin resistance.

 

 

Regular exercise tied to lower health costs with heart disease

(Reuters Health) – Need another reason to exercise? A new study suggests that routine workouts are associated with significantly lower health costs for heart disease patients. Patients with heart disease who did moderate to vigorous physical activity for 30 minutes at least five times a week saved an average of more than $2,500 (about 2222 euros) in annual healthcare costs, the study found.

Dr. Barry Sears Dr. Sears Comments:

Sitting for no more than 15 to 20 minutes at a time and then walking around the room for 2 minutes is the one exercise that has the greatest return on time investment. Usually it takes 1 hour of vigorous exercise to overcome 8 hours of sitting.

 

Report: Sit less to stave off heart disease

Sitting and other sedentary behaviors are so hazardous to health that adults should significantly limit the time they are inactive to stave off heart disease and stroke, a special American Heart Association panel said in a report published Monday.

 

 

Dr. Barry Sears Dr. Sears Comments:

You can further increase BDNF by increasing your omega-3 fatty acid intake (Ferreira et al Lipids Health Dis 2014; 13:44) besides reducing neuroinflammation that is the underlying cause of MS in the first place.

Moderate Exercise Benefits MS, Too Much Exercise Does Not

Not many years ago, people with multiple sclerosis were advised to stay in bed and not exert themselves. But over the last 20 years, research has shown that exercise benefits those with MS. Patients energy and balance can increase, muscle atrophy can decrease, according to Multiple Sclerosis News Today.

 

Dr. Barry Sears Dr. Sears Comments:

The best form of exercise to reduce insulin resistance remains high-intensity exercise.  It is more difficult than cruising on a treadmill watching TV, but the hormonal benefits are dramatic.

 

 

Dr. Barry Sears Dr. Sears Comments:

Since exercise has little effect on weight loss, perhaps the government and Coca-Cola should team up to keep trying to convince people that they can exercise their way out of obesity.

Dr. Barry Sears Dr. Sears Comments:

After points #1 and #2, the data get a little dicier.  Bottom line, treating obesity is a lot more complex than “eating less and exercising more”.

 

Dr. Barry Sears Dr. Sears Comments:

Before you keep beating the tired old dog of physical inactivity, you might want to try a new suspect:  Gut inflammation.  There is growing evidence that disturbances in the microbial balance in the gut lead to increased inflammation that translates into increased weight gain.  The most likely dietary suspects appear to be saturated fats.

 

Dr. Barry Sears Dr. Sears Comments:

High-intensity and cardio diets are essentially the same if you replace the grains with more fruits and vegetables.