Dr. Barry Sears Dr. Sears Comments:

I suspect the obesity rates are actually higher since people tend to always overstate their height, if not also their weight, in these type of telephone surveys.  My suspicion is given further credence by the growing epidemic of diabetes when the criteria is the blood glucose levels, not a telephone survey.

Obesity rates rising for U.S. women and teens

(Reuters Health) – Obesity rates for U.S. women and teens are on the rise, according to two new studies from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published in JAMA. About 41 percent of women and 35 percent of men are obese, according to survey data collected as recently as 2014 and reported in one of the studies.